EKTA

Ekta is the moniker used by Daniel Götesson for a career now almost two decades long. Artist but also animator, muralist, designer and illustrator, Ekta has been able to challenge categories and definitions translating his personal artistic vision into most […]

Biography / EKTA

Ekta is the moniker used by Daniel Götesson for a career now almost two decades long. Artist but also animator, muralist, designer and illustrator, Ekta has been able to challenge categories and definitions translating his personal artistic vision into most of the different languages of visual art and at the same time achieving in every and each field some of the most excellent and respected works in Europe’s recent history.

Götesson’s art is an endless string of variations, progressions, evolutions and involutions, a coherent incoherency of approaches and a recurring process of creation and destruction which evades and completes at the same time the contradictory ideas of perfection and failure. The production of the Swedish artist could be seen as a rhythmical and relentless fluctuation between two extremes. In his work a strong need for boldness, bright colors and perfect composition comes necessarily along with the desire for its destruction by a craving for roughness, violent gestures and by a fascination for the aesthetically unpleasant. The contrast and at the same time dynamic osmosis between these clashing yet inseparable aspects of Ekta’s work is unequivocally at the origin of some of the most groundbreaking and influential artworks of the last decade.

Driven by the need of moving forward, of challenging materials, rules and aesthetics, Götesson has never lingered into easy choices or repetitions, but he has instead chosen to allow himself and his practice to step into the world of the unexpected which is where an artist can find the best intuitions, but also has to embrace uncountable failures. Engaging in an uniquely brave process of creation and destruction, of perfection and self sabotage, Ekta does not search neither for a breakthrough nor for a pleasing solution because there is no need for a chorus on a melody which already finds its strength exactly in its uneasy balance, shifting aesthetic and relentless process.

Mattia Lullini & Alina Vergnano