Hayley Welsh

Bayswater / Australia

British born artist Hayley Welsh, has established herself as one of the newest creatives in the Western Australian art scene. There is something quite fantastical and a little bit dark lurking in Hayley’s work. Her unique style displays a technical approach, mixed with nostalgia and humour. […]

Biography / Hayley Welsh

British born artist Hayley Welsh, has established herself as one of the newest creatives in the Western Australian art scene, having made the move to Australia in 2009. Quoted by Jetstar Magazine as being one of the ‘Top Ten Street Artists You Should Know By Now’ and having exhibited internationally in London and New York, she is renown for her surreal, wide-eyed characters and whimsical street art, reminding us all to ‘Listen To Your Little Voice’.

There is something quite fantastical and a little bit dark lurking in Hayley’s work. Utilising various surfaces from walls to found objects as her canvas, she reveals curious creatures, so cute they can’t be trusted. With their ominous softness, Hayley explores inner voices of self doubt and fear, weaving a poignant narrative into every piece - a message for each person to reflect on in
the moment.

Hayley’s unique style displays a technical approach, mixed with nostalgia and humour. Surface images that might otherwise seem inviting, have an other-wordly quality that take them places
beyond the image in front of us. Her playful aura eludes to a childlike innocence, yet this is juxtaposed with darker undertones of the unknown and abyss.

“Generous, honest, original, carefully considered and unpretieciusly humorous.” (Shaun Tan)

“She weaves a poignant narrative into almost every piece -- a message for each person to reflect on in the moment like “take the leap,” and “dream big.” (The Huffington Post)

“Welsh is young but already an accomplished artist with obvious technical ability and a unique style. Her work can best be compared to Mark Ryden’s, featuring big-eyed creatures that are so cute they can’t be trusted; an ominous softness.” (Ask A New Yorker)

“There is an inherent sense of wonderment in much of the work that eludes to childlike innocence, though the presence of darkness and the corrupt is never far away.” (Andy Quilty)