Nerea Ferrer

Nerea Ferrer is an architect, visual artist, and contemporary art researcher from Madrid, Spain. After completing her studies in Architecture and Urban Planning, she was awarded a fellowship to work in San Francisco for a year, where she also began […]

Biography / Nerea Ferrer

Nerea Ferrer is an architect, visual artist, and contemporary art researcher from Madrid, Spain. After completing her studies in Architecture and Urban Planning, she was awarded a fellowship to work in San Francisco for a year, where she also began her artistic practice. Upon returning to Madrid, she became a member of the art and architecture collective Basurama (2018-2024). She has developed and led over 50 projects worldwide for institutions such as Matadero Madrid, MAAT Lisbon, Floating University Berlin, and Socle du Monde Danish Biennale, among others. Just before relocating to Berlin, she participated as an artist-in-residence in Contested Territories, focusing on researching extractive territories in the context of renewable energies in the Atacama Desert, Chile.

Her work revolves around speculative futures, post-humanism, and the dichotomy between nature and culture. Her production typically includes experimental drawing or spatial installations, exploring overlapping languages and technology to express various perspectives and contexts, and dissecting possible representations of territory through a utopian/dystopian lens.

About the project

This project aims to rethink our capitalistic-productive urban contexts through Berlin’s childhood relationship with urban spaces and their capacity to engage with alternative everyday elements in the city. By researching play practices, children’s perspectives on the world, and collaborative thinking for a hopeful future, the main objective is to create speculative maps and intricate narratives to promote playful dynamics as the primary focus for transforming our future cities. Inspired by Constant Nieuwenhuys’ New Babylon, the project is conceived as an experiment, exploring the changes our cities must undergo to embrace transversally ludic approaches over purely productive ones. It proposes to initiate and sustain the process of charting paths toward a more inclusive, livable, biodiverse, and mentally healthy urban future for all inhabitants.

Photos: Christian Rückert