Nóra Juhász

Nóra Juhász (b. 1993, Budapest) is an interdisciplinary artist and theatre maker. In her works she uses various techniques ranging from virtual tools to performativity and hacking to explore questions concerning topics of communication, misinformation and self-expression. Her projects are […]

Biography / Nóra Juhász

Nóra Juhász (b. 1993, Budapest) is an interdisciplinary artist and theatre maker. In her works she uses various techniques ranging from virtual tools to performativity and hacking to explore questions concerning topics of communication, misinformation and self-expression. Her projects are usually implemented in social contexts and are characterized by the contrast of strict conceptuality and radical playfulness. In recent years, she developed projects that revolve around the practice of virtual role-play, experimenting with non-existent identities in real-life situations to question the notion of what is accepted as ‘true’.

Before graduating as a Painter at Hungarian University of Fine Arts, Nóra also studied Applied Stage Design and Visual Art at Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. For years, she carried two parallel practices as a theatre stage designer and a visual artist before eventually integrating her separate activities into one organic interdisciplinary practice. Working both independently and in collaboration with other artists, her projects are presented in various spaces ranging from open-access online platforms to traditional venues of contemporary art and theatre.

About the project

During the project ‘Connection is Corrupted’, the artist is an artist, and another artist, an art gallery, a communication manager, an ethical hacker and also some place in Berlin. It is a virtual role-play game, an ode to letter communication and a demonstration of manipulated online realities.

The project’s goal is to critically reflect on online social media and virtual communication and to use catfishing as a constructive tool, similar to using a cheat code in games to build something new. Through a series of interactions with other entities, the role-play situations may eventually lead to something real: sharing knowledge, building connections and exchange between participants. Even if it involves parties of questionable authenticity. Thus the results, may that be the actual production of artworks, a new network of communication, or anything else, are entirely dependent on reactions of the environment.

Photos: Christian Rückert

Screenshots: Provided by Nóra Juhász